About Yarn and Knitting

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KNITTING TIP - How do you do a mattress stitch
November 14, 2022

KNITTING TIP - How do you do a mattress stitch

Is it normal to see flowers  when doing the mattress stitch  ?? For some strange and unknown reason, I was able to memorize the mattress stitch technique by visualizing flowers. HORIZONTAL MATTRESS SEAM: The two leaves of the flower represent a stitch. When I have to join two rows together (horizontal seam), I visualize a road between the rows and I have to pick up each flower (stitch) by passing the tapestry needle behind them... VERTICAL MATTRESS SEAM: And when I have to join two rows together (vertical seam), I imagine that I have to pull on the stem by passing the needle between the two leaves... I'm sharing this mattress stitch tip hoping it may help visual learner like me!

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Knitting tutorial : How to Steek
January 18, 2022

Knitting tutorial : How to Steek

When knitting stranded colorwork (fairisle), it is often easier to knit in the round, always on the right side of the work. It is also easier to read the pattern if you always working in the same direction, knitting on the right side from right to left. This is why the "steeking" technique was invented: to be able to knit in the round (in a tube) and to be able to create an opening (or openings) by cutting the knitting afterwards.   The following video tutorial shows you this technique from start to finish and you will also find under this video the written explanations with illustrations to learn how to prepare the steek before opening and how to cut the knitting!  STEP 1: To make a steek, we will normally increase 5 stitches at the location where the opening will be created later.  These 5 stitches will then be cut in the center and are usually knitted by alternating the 2 colors of your colorwork. In the example below, our steek is composed of a blue, beige, blue (center), beige, blue stitches: STEP 2: After binding-off the stitches, use a yarn slightly smaller than your work yarn and using a hook, secure the center stitch of the steek by poking the hook behind the "left leg" of the stitch to the right of the center stitch and behind the "right leg" of the center stitch (identified in red above). Using your hook, grab and pull the yarn behind these two "legs" as shown below: Repeat all the way to the top to secure the steek opening by pulling one stitch behind each "leg" (shown in red below)... STEP 3: Finish the first side by cutting the yarn and passing the yarn through the last loop (stitch) and then turn the knitting 180 degrees to repeat the same thing on the other side of the center stitch as shown below (identified in pink) STEP 4: When both sides of the center stitch are secured, use a sharp pair of scissors for best precision and cut the middle of the center stitch (bottom up or top down doesn't matter, as long as you make sure to cut the center of the stitch). STEP 5: Once you have cut the steek and opened the fabric, fold the remaining stitches of the steek inside the fabric and secure it with a piece of yarn and a tapestry needle. Have fun working your steek: the technique may scare you the first time but you will see that it is very easy to do! Happy Knitting!!

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How to knit Short Rows
September 30, 2021

How to knit Short Rows

Short Rows - What is it exactly? This is a way of knitting the stitches back and forth without knitting to the end of the row, which means that there are stitches remaining at the end of the row when you turn the knit. The short rows are used to adjust the volume of the knit: either to create a relief in a knit, such as for the hollow of the heel in a sock, for example, or to change the shape / direction of a flat knit.   Right Image - source: http://www.purlwise.com/short_rows/ Several effects can be created with short rows! We are happy to offer several knitting patterns with short rows that you will find at the very bottom of this page! 👇👇👇  How to knit Short rows Many knitters dread (and even avoid!) Patterns containing short rows. Firstly because the short rows require a little more concentration to find one's way: when one does not knit the rows to the end, it sometimes becomes more difficult to give oneself benchmarks and to follow the instructions. In addition, we may end up with a small hole in the place where we wrapped our knitting. To solve this small hole problem, several techniques exist. The most common is the technique of winding the next stitch before turning (or "wrap & turn"). You can discover it on Knit Spirit TV just HERE The German Method or "German short rows" A few years ago I discovered the German method more commonly called the "German short rows". I like this method that produces a rather transparent look and without holes! So for much of you, we have prepared this video to illustrate this method and you will also find the explanations written below.     Here is how to knit the short rows using the German method: when you have turned your knitting and you are ready to knit your first row short, with the yarn in front , slip the stitch as if to purl and pull the yarn behind the work by pulling slightly so as to stretch the stitch on the needle. This way of pulling the yarn will have the effect of creating a "double stitch" composed of 2 strands that cross and wrap on the right needle. If the next stitch is a knit stitch, knit the stitch as you normally would. If the next stitch is a purl stitch, bring the yarn back (the yarn will have gone around the needle from behind and back in front) and purl the next stitch. On the next row, when you need to knit the previously wrapped knit, knit the two strands that are stretched on the needle together as you would normally knit a stitch or purl as instructed by the pattern. Substitute the "Wrap & Turn" for the "German Short Rows"  If you knit a pattern that suggests the "wrap & turn" method but you prefer to use the German method, here's what you need to know: When the pattern says, “wrap the stitch and turn," ignore this instruction and simply knit back. In the next row, when the pattern says, for example, "knit 5 back", you slip the first stitch as explained above and knit 4 back (the first stitch being slipped ...). Remember to subtract one stitch from the next row since the first slipped stitch is included in the number of stitches to work. That's it ... it's as simple as that :) Now that you have the tools, why not grab your needles and put your new knowledge to the test? Happy knitting!  

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HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN
July 15, 2021

HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN

HOW TO SUBSTITUTE YARN IN A KNITTING PATTERN To substitute the suggested yarn in a knitting pattern, here's what you need to consider: CHARACTERISTICS OF THE ORIGINAL YARN FIBERS: Merino wool, alpaca, cotton, hemp… STYLE: Hairy, woolen, silky, number of ply COLOR TYPE : Solid, striped, gradient, speckled? YARN WEIGHT: Lace, sport, fingering, worsted… LENGTH (YARDAGE) & SKEIN (OR BALL) WEIGHT THE FINAL USE OF KNITWEAR Is it a seasonal garment? Durability (will be worn in shoes?) Softness (worn on the skin or over a sweater?) Maintenance (must be machine washable?) Drape (must be smooth or needs toning). Was the yarn in the original pattern knitted with larger needles than the recommended size to achieve an openwork effect? Stranded colorwork (fairisle) ideal with woolen yarn Must be feltable (choose an untreated wool, i.e. the yarn must not have the mention "superwash") CALCULATION TO SUBSTITUTE THE REQUIRED QUANTITY Here is how to calculate the amount of required yarn when using a different yarn than the one suggested in a knitting pattern. NOTE :  If the yarn specifications are not identified in the pattern, Google and Ravelry.com will always be your best allies!   ORIGINAL YARN SUBSTITUTE YARN Collection Louise Robert Algua Marina Katia Concept Seacell Cotton 70% silk, 30% seacell 250 meters / 100 grams Gauge : 20 to 22 sts = 10 cm Sug needles : 3 / 4 mm 75% cotton, 25% lyocell 120 meters / 50 grams Gauge: 21 sts = 10 cm Sug needles : 3 / 3.5 mm Quantity required to knit the pattern in the chosen size : 5 skeins See the answer below … Calculation of the meters required to knit the pattern : 250 meters x 5 skeins = I need a total of 1250 meters   Calculation of the quantity required in the substitute yarn : 1250 meters ÷ 120 meters = 10.41 rounded to 11 balls   MAKE SURE TO MEET THE SUGGESTED GAUGE SUGGESTED GAUGE 10 STITCHES & 11 ROWS = 10 CM² In most patterns, the number of rows suggested in the gauge is not very important since you can easily add or subtract rows to get the required length. On the other hand, the number of stitches must be the same to get the right knit size (unless you are knitting a shawl or other garment for which the final size is not important) but take note of the following: NOTE: a different gauge could mean that you will use more or less yarn than indicated in the pattern so be sure to take this into consideration!  👇👇👇 TO GET THE PRINTABLE VERSION OF THIS POST, CLICK HERE!

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Knitting Abbreviations English - French
July 09, 2021

Knitting abbreviations English - French

GET HERE ALL THE MOST COMMON KNITTING ABBREVIATIONS WE USE IN OUR KNITTING PATTERNS IN ENGLISH AND FRENCH You will find in this table all the knitting abbreviations in English and French allowing you to better understand most knitting patterns but will also help you to translate knitting patterns from French to English. DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION (English in alphabetical order): Knitting abbreviations list English - French DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION (French in alphabetical order): Knitting abbreviations list French - English TIP: On this webpage (and also in the PDF file from your desktop) you can use the command CTRL-F to quickly find the abbreviation you are looking for. Enjoy! ABBREVIATIONS ENGLISH DESCRIPTION ABRÉVIATIONS FRENCH DESCRIPTION  Approx Approximatley Approx Appoximativement Beg Begin n/a Commencer BO Bind off n/a Rabattre / Rabat BOR Beginning of rounds DDT Début du/des tour(s) brCdd BRIOCHE CENTERED DOUBLE DECREASE, involving 5 sts (slip the first stitch as if to knit (STITCH-1), slip the next stitch as if to knit (STITCH-2), slip the next stitch on a cable needle (STITCH-3) and hold in front. Knit the next stitch (STITCH-4), pass the last slipped stitch (STITCH-2) over STITCH- 4 and slip back STITCH-4 on left needle. Pass next stitch (STITCH-5) over STITCH-4. Slip STITCH-4 back to right nee- dle. Pass the first stitch (STITCH-1) over STITCH-4. Slip STITCH-3 from cable needle on left needle, put back STITCH-4 on left needle and pass STITCH-3 over STITCH 4 – 4 sts BR-DD (Diminution de 4 m qui se réalise sur 5 m) : avec le fil devant, vous venez de gl1-env. Glisser la m brioche suivante à l’end (maille 1), glisser encore la m brioche suivante à l’end (maille 2), mettre la m brioche suivante sur une aiguille auxiliaire et tenir devant (maille 3). Tricoter la m suivante end (maille 4), passer la dern m glissée (maille 2) par-dessus la maille 4 et remettre cette m sur l’aig. Gauche. Passer la m suivante (maille 5) par-dessus la maille 4, remettre la maille 4 sur l’aig droite, passer la maille 1 par-dessus la maille 4, remettre la maille en attente sur l’aig. Auxiliaire (maille 3) sur l’aig. Gauche, glisser la maille 4 sur l’aig gauche et passer la maille 3 par-dessus la maille 4. brk BRIOCHE KNIT (also known as a bark: knit the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with its yarn over). Br-end Maille endroit brioche: tricoter la maille et le fil qui enroule la maille ensemble à l’endroit comme une seule maille. brk-yo-brk 2-STITCH INCREASE (brk1 leaving st on left nee- dle, yo (yarn forward under needle then over needle to back), then brk1 into same stitch — 2 sts increased). BR-END-JETÉ-BR-END Puisque le point brioche se tricote sur un nombre de mailles pairs, lorsqu’on augmente en brioche on augmente toujours 2 mailles à la fois : Tricoter une maille endroit brioche mais ne pas relâcher la maille de l’aiguille gauche, ramener le fil devant pour faire un jeté, tricoter encore la même maille endroit brioche et relâcher. 3 mailles ont été créées à partir d’une seule maille. brk-yo-brk-yo-brk 4-STITCH INCREASE (similar to BRK-YO- BRK, simply repeat the last part one more time : brk1 leaving st on left needle, yo, brk1 into same stitch, yo, brk1 into same stitch — 4 sts increased). BR-END-JETÉ-END-JETÉ-END Très similaire au BR-END-JETÉ- END, il faut simplement répéter la dernière partie une deuxième fois : Tricoter une maille endroit brioche mais ne pas relâcher la maille de l’aiguille gauche, ramener le fil devant pour faire un jeté, tricoter encore la même maille endroit brioche et ne pas relâcher, ramener le fil devant pour faire un jeté et tricoter encore la même maille endroit brioche puis relâcher. 5 mailles ont été créées à partir d’une seule maille. brLsl - 2-STITCH DECREASE THAT SLANTS TO THE LEFT, involving 3 sts (slip the first stitch as if to knit, brk the following two stitches together, pass the slipped stitch over = 2 sts decreased). BR-DIM-G (Diminution de 2 m qui se réalise sur 3 m) : avec le fil devant, vous venez de gl1-env. Glisser la première m comme pour la tricoter à l’endroit, tricoter 2 end-ens, passer la m glissée par-dessus la m tricotée. brRsl 2-STITCH DECREASE THAT SLANTS TO THE RIGHT, involv- ing 3 sts (slip the first stitch as if to knit, knit the next stitch, pass the slipped stitch over, place stitch on left hand needle and pass the following stitch over. Place st on right hand needle = 2 sts decreased). BR-DIM-D (Diminution de 2 m qui se réalise sur 3 m) : avec le fil devant, vous venez de gl1-env. Glisser la première m comme pour la tricoter à l’endroit, tricoter la prochaine maille à l’endroit, passer la m glissée par-dessus la m tricoté, remettre la m sur l’aig gauche et passer la 2e m de l’aig gauche par-dessus la première. Remettre la m qui reste sur l’aig droite. brp BRIOCHE PURL (also known as burp: purl the stitch that was slipped in the previous row together with its yarn over). Br-env Maille envers brioche : tricoter la maille et le fil qui enroule la maille ensemble à l’envers comme une seule maille. CC Contrasting color CC Couleur contrastante cn Cable needle aig-aux Aiguille auxiliaire (aiguille à torsade) CO Cast on n/a Monter / Montage DD DOUBLE DECREASE (slip 2 sts together as if to knit, slip 1 st as if to purl, insert left needle in the front of these 3 sts and knit together in this position = 2 sts decreased). DD DOUBLE DIMINUTION (glisser 2 mailles ensemble à l’endroit, glisser 1 maille à l’envers, piquer l’aig gauche devant ces 3 mailles et les tricoter ensemble dans cette position) dec Decrease / decreased dim Diminué / diminution( DPN Double pointed needles n/a Aiguilles double-pointes G st Garter stitch n/a point mousse Inc Increased / Increase(s) Aug Augmenté(s) / augmentation(s) K Knit end Endroit K2tog Knit two stitches together 2end-ens Tricoter 2 mailles ensemble à l'endroit kfb Knit into front and back of stitch. To see our video tutorial on this technique: https://youtu.be/3a_ryoJSdcA endX2 Tricoter la même maille dans le brin avant et le brin arrière. Pour voir cette technique en vidéo: https://youtu.be/3a_ryoJSdcA k-yo-k In the next stitch, knit 1 stitch, yarn over, knit 1 again. end-j-end Dans la maille suivante, tricoter : 1 maille à l’endroit, faire un jeté et retricoter la même m à l’endroit. LH Left hand n/a main gauche LLI Left lifted increase - Use left needle to lift the left leg of the stitch two rows below the one just knit, put this left leg on left needle and use right needle to knit this leg. You can find our LLI video on Youtube HERE: https://youtu.be/wRppmewE8Ow Augl-g Augmentation levée inclinée à gauche (utiliser la maille 2 rangs en dessous de la dernière maille tricotée située sur l’aiguille droite. Remonter la « patte gauche » de cette maille sur l’aiguille gauche et tricoter cette « patte » à l’endroit). Pour voir cette technique en vidéo: https://youtu.be/wRppmewE8Ow LN Left needle Aig-G Aiguille gauche M1L Pick up horizontal bar between the stitch on the left needle and the right needle from front to back, knit through back leg. Aug-g Augmentation intercalaire, inclinée à gauche : avec l’aiguille gauche, relever le fil horizontal entre la m que vous venez de tricoter et la suivante en piquant de l’avant vers l’arrière, tricoter end en piquant dans le brin arrière. M1R Pick up horizontal bar between the stitches from back to front, knit through front leg. Aug-d Augmentation intercalaire, inclinée à droite : avec l’aiguille gauche, relever le fil horizontal entre la m que vous venez de tricoter et la suivante en piquant de l’arrière vers l’avant, tricoter end en piquant dans le brin avant. MC Main color CP Couleur principale n/a Last dern Dernier (es) ndl Needle aig Aiguille P Purl env Envers P2tog Purl two stitches together 2env-ens Tricoter 2 mailles ensemble à l’envers Pm Place marker Pm Placer un marqueur psso Pass slipped stitch over pmgm Passer la m glissée par-dessus la maille R row (or round) Rg(s) ou R Rang(s) rep Repeat rep Répéter; repetition RH Right hand n/a main droite RLI Right lifted increase - With right needle, lift the right leg of the stitch one row below the next unworked stitch, put this right leg on left needle and knit it. You can find our RLI video on Youtube HERE: https://youtu.be/wRppmewE8Ow Augl-d Augmentation levée inclinée à droite (utiliser la maille du rang précédent sous l’aiguille gauche. Remonter la « patte droite » de cette maille sur l’aiguille gauche et tricoter cette « patte » à l’endroit). Pour voir cette technique en vidéo: https://youtu.be/wRppmewE8Ow Rnd(s) Round(s) T Tour RS Right side END Endroit du tricot sk2p / Sl1-k2tog-psso Slip 1 stitch as if to purl, knit 2 stitches together, pass the slipped stitch over. SD Surjet double (Glisser 1m, tricoter 2end-ens, passer la m glissée par dessus la m tricotée). skp / skpo / S1K1P Slip 1 stitch as if to knit, knit 1, pass slipped stitch over knit stitch. SS Surjet Simple = Glisser 1 maille, tricoter 1 end, passer la m glissée par-dessus la m tricotée. sl Slip (When not mentioned, slip the stitch as if to purl). gl Glisser (lorsque la façon de glisser n’est pas mentionner, glisser la maille comme pour la tricoter à l’envers). SL1-GSR According to the « GERMAN SHORT ROW », with yarn in front, slip the next stitch (as if to knit on right side or as if to purl on wrong side) and pull the yarn straight up and over on the back of the needle. This will create a “double stitch” with 2 “legs” on right needle. If the next stitch to work is a knitted stitch, knit it in this position. If the next stitch to work is a purled stitch, after the yarn was pulled over the needle, bring the forward and purl the next stitch. On the next row, work the SL1- GSR (or double-stitch) as one stitch: insert right needle under both legs and work according to the pattern (knit or purl these two legs together). Gl1-GSR Selon la méthode « GERMAN SHORT ROW », avec le fil devant, glisser la maille comme pour la tricoter à l’envers et tirer le fil derrière l’ouvrage en tirant légèrement de façon à étirer la maille sur l’aiguille. Cette façon de tirer le fil aura pour effet de créer une « maille double » composée de 2 brins qui se croisent sur l’aiguille. Si la prochaine maille à tricoter est une maille endroit, tricoter la maille à l’endroit directement dans cette position. Si la prochaine maille à tricoter est une maille envers, ramener le fil devant (le fil aura fait le tour de l’aiguille en passant par derrière et en revenant devant) et tricoter la maille à l’envers. Au rang suivant, pour tricoter le GL1-GSR (ou la «maille double»), tricoter les deux brins qui sont étirés sur l’aiguille ensemble à l’endroit ou à l’envers selon les instructions du patron. Sl1pw Slip a stitch as if to purl. Gl1-env Glisser une mailles comme pour la tricoter envers Sl1yo following a K or Brk st Bring the working yarn under the needle to the front of the work, slip the next stitch as if to purl, then bring the yarn over the needle (and over the slipped stitch) to the back, in position to work the following stitch. BR-GL (avant 1 END ou BR-END) Avec le fil devant l’ouvrage glisser la prochaine maille (comme pour la tricoter à l'envers); toujours avec le fil devant, tricoter la prochaine maille à l’endroit : le fil restera pris au-dessus de la maille glissée. Sl1yo following a P or Bro st Working yarn is already in front, slip the next stitch as if to purl, then bring the yarn over the needle (and over the slipped stitch), then to the front under the needle, into position to work the following stitch BR-GL (avant 1 ENV ou BR-ENV) Avec le fil devant l’ouvrage, glisser la prochaine maille (comme pour la tricoter à l’envers); enrouler le fil par-dessus la maille glissée (comme pour un jeté) et tricoter la prochaine maille à l’envers : le fil restera pris au-dessus de la maille glissée. Sm Slip marker Gm Glisser le marqueur SSK (Decrease) = slip 1 stitch as if to knit, slip 1 stitch as if to purl, insert left needle in front of these 2 stitches and knit in this position. GGT (Diminution) = glisser 1m comme pour la tricoter à l’end, glisser 1m comme pour la tricoter à l’env, insérer l’aiguille gauche devant ces 2m et les tricoter ensemble dans cette position. Peut se substituer par un surjet simple ou en tricotant 2end-ens dans le brin arrière. St st Stockinette stitch n/a point jersey st(s) Stitch(es) m Maille(s) tbl Through back of loop torse Tricoter la maille en piquant dans le brin arrière. tog Together ens Ensemble W&T Wrap and turn (short rows) E&T Enrouler et tourner (rangs raccourcis) WS Wrong side ENV Envers du tricot Wyib With yarn in back Afder Avec fil derrière Wyif With yarn in front Afdev Avec fil devant yo Yarn over Maille jeté  

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Casting on Toe-up: the Turkish Cast On Method
February 15, 2021

Casting on Toe-up: the Turkish Cast On Method

Here is a technique that allows you to cast on stitches to knit socks "toe-up". This type of cast on is known as a "toe-up" cast on that is called the "Turkish Cast-on". This video is in french with english subtitles and is followed by illustrated explanations in pictures.  1 – Start with a slip knot about 30-40 cm from the end of the yarn.  2 – Align your 2 needles so that they point to the right and place the slip knot on the bottom needle.  3 –Wrap the yarn connected to the ball by going behind the needles from the bottom up and in front of the needles from top to bottom. 4 – Wrap 1/4 number of the total number of stitches (for a 32 stitch cast on, wrap around 8 times). 5 - Pull on lower the needle to work on the stitches on the top. 6 –Knit what will become the first stitch of the top, the yarn must stay in the front of your cable (which will close the last stitch at the bottom.) 7 –Knit the upper stitches. At this point the "stitches" will be very loose, this is normal! 8 –Once you've knit all the stitches, turn your hands clockwise, taking care to keep the right side of the work in front of you. 9 – Your slip knot is now on the top cable. 10 – Push the upper needle on the stitches and pull on the lower needle to work on the upper stitches. 11 –Remove the slip knot and pull on the yarn to untie it. Use the two strands as they are (one strand in front and one strand behind the cable) to knit the upper stitches. 12 –You will double the number of stitches on the top needle... 13 – Once all the stitches are knit, turn the needles clockwise taking care to always keep the right side facing you.. 14 –Now that your needles point to the right, push the needle up and pull the needle down. 15 –Use the 2 strands again to knit the upper stitches using the needle at the bottom. 16 – You will double the stitches of the second half.. 17 – That's your finished cast on! 18 – I suggest you cut the tail of the yarn, so as not to confuse it with the working yarn! Tips and tricks: You have to be familiar with the "magic loop" to follow these explanations. When you are ready to knit, your needles always point to the right. Always use the bottom needle to work the upper needle. Always keep the right side of the knitting in front of you when handling your needles: the common mistake of beginners is to turn the work on the wrong side ... To use the strands as they are, when the strand is in front of the cable, it is because it will form a stitch on the next round. If you are missing a stitch during the cast on process, it is because you have failed to follow this instruction. Make sure you have a good quality circular needle. Practice makes perfect: give yourself the chance to learn this technique of casting on, you will certainly appreciate it once acquired! We offer a number of knitting patterns to practice this technique in our online store !

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Knitting charts: tips and tricks
November 13, 2020

Knitting charts: tips and tricks

Knitting charts… They intimidate several knitters! They may seem scary when you look at the sum of these little squares filled with various mystical symbols aligned together... Do not panic : The thing is to get organized ! First, here are the basic rules for reading knitting charts. The knitting charts read the same as you knit: if you knit back and forth you will have to read your rows (odd) from right to left and your rows (even) from left to right. If you knit in the round, you must read your charts from right to left at all times. For stitch patterns charts (and not colorwork charts), squares identified in black (as in the illustration below) or missing squares are missing stitches (either because they were decreased earlier or because they will be increased later.) You must ignore these stitches (they do not exist) and continue with the next square on the chart. Check to see if all the rows are shown on your chart : Some charts show only the even rows and / or odd will tell you to knit the row back and / or even as the stitches appear. This is an important detail !! Easy tips to follow knitting charts Personally I really like working with stitch markers. In the example of the knitting chart shown above, this is a pattern that repeats all around the neck. I will prepare my work by placing a marker between each repetition in the chart. (shown in the illustration below by the red lines.) This way it will be easier for me to read and execute the chart on my row as well as to identify a possible error in my kntting. I do not need to finish the full round before I realize it and undo the complete round to find the error... Secondly, I almost always work my charts with a "Post-it". So I take it off the chart and put it on the next row as the knit moves on. The post-it is also very convenient to write your notes: Legend points illustrated on the chart, number of completed rows, motivational quotes, etc!   In the case of wider charts, you will need a Pattern Holder with a magnetic ruler as this one: Knitter's Pride Pattern Holder.   I like to cut the chart into smaller sections for easier reading. Take the following chart for example:   Reading each row of 60 stitches can be tedious and we will most likely need to recount our stitches along the way. I suggest you cut out your chart as well: use a red pencil to dissect different sections of your chart and place markers in the same places on your knitting (see illustration below).   For stitch pattern charts (and not colorwork charts) be careful not to dissect your chart in the middle of a cable or decrease / increase or you will have to move your marker constantly. Sometimes, simply adding a pencil line without using markers will make reading the chart easier. For example, draw a red line in the middle of the chart for each multiple of 5 stitches. In order to avoid the repetitive comings and goings of your eyes between your chart and your knitting, try to mentally compose yourself a little nursery rhyme. Take the chart below for example:   Suppose you have to repeat this pattern 10 times in a row around your work, here is the series you need to memorize for the bottom chart: First row on the bottom of the chart (row 33) : 2-1-5-1-3 … 2-1-5-1-3 … 2-1-5-1-3 … Next row (row 34) : 1-1-1-1-3-1-1-1-2 ... 1-1-1-1-3-1-1-1-2 ... If the series is longer, add to the nursery rhyme this melodious tune eg ("Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"), it will be even easier to remember! The idea is to find tips that help you and make it easier for you to read your charts. Let's try to put these new tricks into practice with few of our knitting patterns: Hat and mittens  Nova Scotia Sheeps Jigs and Reels pullover Christmas Socks Happy knitting to all !!

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How to cast-on a shawl using the Garter Tab Cast-on technique
November 04, 2020

How to cast-on a shawl using the Garter Tab Cast-on technique

This technique is often used to start the knitting of a shawl. It is a way of casting on the stitches around a small tab of garter stitch to avoid the formation of a "hollow" at the base of the shawl, in order to produce a nice uniform border. This technique is referred as "Garter tab cast-on". That said, you will find my own version of this technique in the following video since I introduced the use of a NEKO cable needle and I use my left needle to pick-up the stitches on the left side of the garter tab. As a picture is worth a thousand words, discover all the details in this video:

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grafting - kitchener stitch video tutorial
November 02, 2020

Knitting tutorial video - Grafting (or kitchener stitch) method explained

In this knitting tutorial, learn how to sew two rows of stitches together using the grafting technique, also known as "kitchener stitch". The grafting technique is often used to close the toe of a sock, for example. You will also see it on the shoulders of a sweater or in the assembly of a "granny style" blanket.

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Yarn pooling: what it is and how to manage it
September 07, 2020

Yarn pooling: what it is and how to manage it

Knitting with artisanal yarns requires certain knowledge. First of all you need to know how to wash hand-dyed yarns and you will find a very detailed article on this subject by clicking HERE. Once the issue of care is covered, let's talk about what is commonly known in knitting language as "POOLING". First of all, what is pooling? The term "pooling" is used when the colors of a semi-solid, speckled or variegated yarn all come together in the same place in a knitted fabric. It is easier to illustrate this concept in a picture with a variegated yarn: Here is a perfect example of "pooling". The Grounded pattern you see above has been knitted with a two-tone skein (chocolate and moss green). In one part of this knit, at the waist, you can see chocolate and moss green "pooling" appearing, a bit like a liquid where water and oil refuse to blend. Why is this? Because the combination of "number of stitches and yarn colors" at that particular spot made the chocolate color arrive at the same place on several rows in a row and the moss green followed the rhythm! And don't think that the pooling effect occurs only in multi-colored yarns, you can see it in knits with semi solid colors as well as in the Autumn Breeze pattern. "To pool or not to pool"... That is the question! Some people don't like pooling at all and will do anything to avoid it while others like the effect of pooling so much that some dyers and yarn manufacturers will intentionally dye the yarn to produce this effect. When well mastered, pooling can be very interesting and add a "wow" effect to some projects, but in other cases it can be annoying and produce an undesired result. How to minimise pooling? The best method to minimize pooling is to alternate the skeins (or balls of yarn) every other row if you knit back and forth or every round if you knit in the round. Not only will this way of knitting reduce the "pooling" effect, but it will also ease the transition from one skein to another. Because even when they come from the same dye lot, artisanal yarn skeins are slightly different from each other: the end of one skein does not necessarily correspond to the exact color of the beginning of the next skein. So to avoid a demarcation in your project, alternating the skeins is the best solution. Personally, when I knit sweaters I ALWAYS alternate the skeins between them from the beginning to the end. This method allows me to obtain a homogeneous result while preserving the hand-dyed yarns' unique and artisanal look. It's an easy habit to take and after a while it becomes natural! And if alternating the hanks is not possible? If you have only one skein for example, you could always alternate using the beginning and the end of the same ball, but if the idea is completely repugnant to you, there is still hope: Whenever possible, change the way you knit: if you work in the round, try to knit back and forth or vice versa. Sometimes, a slight modification to the gauge can make things better: try with a needle half a size smaller or larger. Change the knitting stitch pattern: replace the jersey with a seed stitch for example. Adding or removing a few stitches could also make enough difference to break the pooling.  

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